A Few Tweaks

Ms May explained that her Plan B
Was really a wonder, you see
She’d get a few tweaks
And then in ten weeks
The UK would finally be free!

The way I see it, Plan B is essentially a game of chicken. To date, the EU has said that they are firm and will not cede any more ground than that already outlined in the deal on the table. However, with ten weeks to go, the reality that the UK could exit with no deal is starting to hit home. Regardless of what they have said to date, a hard Brexit is going to have real negative impacts on the EU, especially Germany, the Netherlands and France, as they are the biggest trading partners of the UK. So, PM May went back to Parliament and explained that she would go back to the EU and explain that there needed to be some changes or else it was no deal. The first cracks appeared on the EU side with Poland discussing a 5-year transition period as a possibility, although so far, no other EU nation has piped up.

But consider the situation for the ECB. Signor Draghi is desperate to move further down the road of reducing the extraordinary monetary ease that the ECB has implemented. Stopping QE was to be the beginning of the process with the next steps to be slow and steady rate increases. Now, it is already looking like a questionable call, and a hard Brexit will definitely result in even slower Eurozone growth, thus ratcheting up the pressure on Draghi to do something. Remember, this is the man who did ‘whatever it took’ to save the euro during the sovereign debt crisis in 2012. But interest rates are already negative, and they just ended QE last month. Will they really start it up again in a few months’ time? There is significant pressure building on the EU to blink, although whether or not they do is still unclear.

Yesterday I discussed the idea that Parliament would try to take matters into its own hands given its dissatisfaction with PM May’s deal, but that would be an extraordinary outcome, and is in no way certain to be achieved. This morning, the pound has edged higher (just 0.2%) after surprisingly good employment data with the Unemployment Rate falling to 4.0%. Sterling continues to trade well above the lows seen in December though well below most economist estimates of ‘fair value.’ The thing is, given the possibility that there is no Brexit, which would arguably result in a very sharp Sterling rally, as well as the possibility there is a hard Brexit, which would result in a very sharp decline, maybe the pound is in the right place after all. And for hedgers, 50/50 is the best I can offer. If pressed, I would say the odds of no Brexit have increased, but there is still no way to know at this point in time.

Other than this story, however, there is precious little new news of interest to the FX world. The trade situation continues to percolate, as does the US government shutdown, but neither one has seen any change of note overnight. In both cases, there doesn’t appear to be a deal in the near future.

Broadly speaking, risk is off today, with the dollar modestly higher against most counterparts, equity markets softening somewhat along with commodities and Treasury and Bund yields declining slightly. There are still many problems extant in the world, it’s just that none of them are acute right now. However, the odds of another significant disruption appear to be increasing, hence the risk reduction we are witnessing today.

This morning’s data is Existing Home Sales (exp 5.25M), which is unlikely to impact the dollar very much unless it misses by a lot. Otherwise, the market is likely to continue this modest risk aversion unless we hear something about either Trade or the shutdown. In other words, look for a quiet FX session today.

Good luck
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