The Winsome Ms. May

The lady who leads the UK
Last night had a terrible day
Dave Davis resigned
And strongly maligned
The PM, the winsome Ms. May

Arguably the biggest news over the weekend was the sudden resignation last night of the UK Brexit Minister, David Davis, who decided he couldn’t countenance the outcome of Friday’s Cabinet meeting. The crux of that agreement was that the UK would continue to abide by EU food and manufacturing regulations after Brexit becomes final in March. Davis, who had campaigned for Brexit and was always seen as more of a hard-liner, thought this was too much of a concession, and heeded PM May’s general call to leave if he couldn’t get on board. While Dominic Raab, another pro-Brexit voice, quickly replaced him, the resignation has simply highlighted the ongoing uncertainties within the UK on the subject.

Markets, however, have remained surprisingly subdued on the news. It appears that traders are far more focused on how the BOE responds to the Brexit story than on the Brexit story’s daily twists and turns. And as of now, there has been no change in the view that the Old Lady is going to raise rates next month come hell or high water. Futures markets continue to price a more than 80% probability of that occurring. So in the end, despite a key political shakeup, the pound has actually rallied 0.45% and is now more than 2.2% clear of the nadir reached at the end of June. Perhaps the mindset is that PM May now has greater control over the cabinet and so is in a stronger position going forward which means that a soft Brexit will be the outcome. At least, that’s the best I can come up with for now.

Otherwise, the weekend has been extremely quiet. With that in mind I think a recap of Friday’s events is in order. The employment report was probably as good as it gets, at least from the Fed’s perspective. NFP increased a better than expected 213K and last month’s number was revised higher to 244K. The Unemployment Rate actually ticked higher to 4.0%, but that was because the Participation Rate rose as well, up to 62.9%, which while better than last month remains well below the longer-term historical trend. But for now, it demonstrates to the Fed that there is still some slack in the labor market, which means there is less concern that wage increases are going to spur much higher inflation. And the AHE data proved that out, rising 2.7% Y/Y, in line with both expectations and recent history. It seems the Fed is going to continue to focus on the shape of the yield curve rather than rising inflation, at least for now. If, however, we start to see some sharply higher inflation data (CPI is released this Thursday), that may begin to change some thinking there.

The other data Friday showed that the Trade deficit shrank to -$43.1B, it’s smallest gap since October 2016. This is somewhat ironic given that Friday was also the day that the US imposed tariffs on $34 billion of Chinese goods. It is too early to determine exactly how the trade situation will play out, although virtually every economist has forecast it will be a disaster for the US, and if it expands potentially for the world. That said, the equity markets have clearly spoken as Chinese stocks have fallen more than 20% in the past months, while US stocks have edged slightly higher. This story, however, has much further to go with there likely being many new twists and turns going forward.

Here in the middle of the summer, it is a light data week, with Thursday’s CPI clearly the highlight.

Today Consumer Credit $12.7B
Tuesday NFIB Small Biz Optimism 105.6
  JOLT’s Job Openings 6.583M
Wednesday PPI 0.2% (3.2% Y/Y)
  -ex food & energy 0.2% (2.6% Y/Y)
Thursday CPI 0.2% (2.9% Y/Y)
  -ex food & energy 0.2% (2.3% Y/Y)
Friday Michigan Sentiment 98.2

We also hear from four Fed speakers and we are at the point between meetings where there has been enough data for some views to have changed. However, my sense is there will be more discussion of the yield curve than of the economy as that has once again become a hot topic amongst a number of the regional Presidents.

Broadly the dollar has been under pressure overnight, continuing last week’s corrective price action. There has been some indication that data elsewhere in the world, especially in the Eurozone, has started to pick up again. If that trend continues, then I expect that the dollar will remain on its back foot. After all, its recent strength had been predicated on the idea that the US was continuing to show economic strength, diverging from the rest of the world’s near-term prospects. A change in that narrative will clearly change the FX story. However, it is not a foregone conclusion that is the outcome. I remain convinced that the dollar is likely to be the leader for quite a while yet.

Good luck
Adf

Lighthearted

At this point one must be impressed
Investors have not become stressed
A trade war has started
Yet they are lighthearted
With willingness still to invest

On top of that word from the Fed
Is they will keep pushing ahead
With rate hikes until
Our growth starts to chill
Or when markets start to bleed red

There has certainly been a lot to digest in the past twenty-four hours. Arguably the biggest story is the imposition of tariffs by the US on $34 billion worth of Chinese goods, which began at midnight last night. China is responding in kind and the Trump administration is determining whether they want to up the ante by an additional $200 billion. Now that the trade war is ‘officially’ underway, the key questions are just how far it will go and how long it will last. While there has been nothing in the press indicating that background negotiations are ongoing and that things can be resolved soon, based on the US equity market’s insouciance, it certainly seems that many investors feel that is the case. I hope they are correct, and soon, because otherwise I expect that we will see a more substantial correction in stocks. As to the dollar in this case, I expect that it will continue to benefit from its safe haven status in a time of market turmoil.

A second fear for equity investors has to be the Fed, which explained in yesterday’s release of the June meeting minutes, that while the trade situation could well become a concern in the future, for now they are much more focused on the potential for the US economy to overheat. The upshot is that the Fed is bound and determined to continue normalizing policy by gradually raising rates and by allowing the balance sheet to continue to gradually shrink. Speaking of the balance sheet, starting this month, they are going to allow $40 billion per month to roll off, and then beginning in October, it will be $50 billion per month until they reach whatever size they determine is appropriate. That means that $270 billion of bids for Treasury’s are going missing for the rest of the year. As the Fed continues to drain liquidity from the economy, I expect that the dollar will continue to benefit across the board, and that the US equity market will face additional headwinds. After all, QE was effective in its goal of forcing investors further out the risk curve and driving equity prices around the world higher as central banks everywhere hoovered up government bonds. Well, with yields rising and central banks backing away from the market (all while equity prices remain robustly valued) it seems there is ample opportunity for a substantial correction in stocks.

You may have noticed I said exactly the same thing when discussing the trade war situation. My point is that we are starting to see multiple catalysts align for a potential change in tone. A higher dollar and lower US (and likely global) equity prices seem like an increasingly possible outcome. Be prepared.

This leaves us at our third big story for the day, the payroll report this morning. Yesterday’s ADP Employment number was a mild disappointment, rising 177K rather than the 190K expected, but the reason appeared to be a lack of available workers rather than a lack of demand for hiring. In other words, the labor market in the US remains extremely strong. Or so it seems. Here are this morning’s expectations:

Nonfarm Payrolls 195K
Private Payrolls 190K
Manufacturing Payrolls 18K
Unemployment Rate 3.8%
Average Hourly Earnings 0.3% (2.8% Y/Y)
Average Weekly Hours 34.5
Trade Balance -$43.7B

It strikes me that this is a potential third catalyst that will line up with the trade war and Fed story in that a strong print today will encourage the Fed to continue or even accelerate their activities; it will encourage the administration that they can outlast the Chinese in this war of attrition, and so the dollar is likely to firm up while equity markets suffer. In the event payrolls disappoint, I think we could see the dollar’s modest correction lower continue and I expect that equity markets will be fine, at least in the US.

Remarkably, I don’t have space to more fully discuss what appears to be a euro positive, where Chancellor Merkel has averted disaster in Germany by getting the third coalition partner, the SPD, to agree to her immigration reforms thus keeping her government intact. As long as this internal truce lasts, there should be no further impact on the euro, but if the problem arises again (and I’m pretty sure it will soon) the euro is likely to suffer. At the same time, the pound is on tenterhooks as PM May is meeting with her cabinet today to finalize a negotiating stance regarding Brexit. If she cannot get the cabinet to agree, I expect the pound will feel the heat as concern over the fall of the May government will rise and an election campaign just nine months before the deadline for leaving the EU cannot be seen as a positive, especially with the chance that Jeremy Corbyn, the far-left Labour Party leader could become the next PM. Investors will not appreciate him in that seat, at least not at first.

As to the overnight session, the dollar is slightly softer and equity markets are under modest pressure, including US futures, as the market awaits the labor situation report. Remember, too, that many trading desks remain lightly staffed because of the holiday, and so liquidity is going to be a bit less robust than normal. If pressed my thought is that NFP will print near consensus, around 200K. I just wonder if the Unemployment Rate doesn’t tick even lower. And keep an eye on AHE, where my gut tells me it will be 0.4% enough to get Fed tongues wagging again. Net, I like the dollar to end the week on a strong note.

Good luck and good weekend
Adf